Haven Green

Haven Green from the north

Haven Green has existed as common land from medieval times. Cary's Survey of Middlesex (1786) shows a cluster of houses around a triangular shaped green at Ealing Haven, quite distinct from the larger settlement at Ealing Green. Haven Green was purchased as public open space by the Ealing Local Board, at the same time as other common land at Ealing Common and Ealing Green.

Haven Green is the dominant feature of the conservation area. The Green is surrounded by large chestnut trees, planted about one hundred years ago by the far-sighted Charles Jones, surveyor to the Ealing Local Board. The Green is traversed diagonally by a road linking the south-east and north-west corners and which, although important for traffic circulation, detracts from the full enjoyment and recreational use of the open space.

Haven Green provides an important open space close to the busy Ealing shopping centre, and is the focus for the Victorian, Edwardian and more recent residential development of this part of central Ealing.


These are extracts from the Council's own appraisal of the Haven Green Conservation Area. The area is designated in the local Development Plan as "Public Open Space", and the plan also recognises that the surrounding area is one of moderate or severe "local park deficiency" (see Ealing UDP Map4, which was re-confirmed in 2007).

There is now a local group, the Friends of Haven Green, dedicated to the protection of the Green and its surroundings and which is a member of Save Ealing's Centre.

Links

29.1.2010: Notice of application to register Village/Town Green

April 2010: Council objects to application

Friends of Haven Green
Find out more

To receive regular bulletins from Save Ealing's Centre, e-mail mail@saveealingscentre.com


Village green application goes back to Committee

Ealing Council is at last to make a decision on whether Haven Green should be designated as a "town or village green".

The application, first made as long ago as March 2009, has been subject to protracted legal argument. After a year had passed, the Council sought an initial opinion from a QC. The Regulatory Committee, which is responsible for the final decision, then decided to ask the national Planning Inspectorate to set up a public inquiry to settle the issue. However when it was discovered that the Inspectorate could no longer undertake this work, the Council commissioned a further barrister's opinion.

Like the first one, the barrister's report concentrated on the legal background and recommended that the application should be rejected because the provisions of the relevant Acts had not been met. However he also suggested that the supporters of the application should have a chance of reply.

This has now been done. The response claims that the legal position remains unclear, and that the Council should accept the application as being in the spirit of the legislation and in the best interest of Ealing's residents. The matter will return to the Regulatory Committee at its next meeting in November.

23 September 2011